Welcome

  • Posts

    lifeMy Linux storyHow I got started with linux I have been running Linux now for about 4 years or so and in that time (really it was within the first few months) I have realized one thing, windows sucks.

    • life

      My Linux storyHow I got started with linux I have been running Linux now for about 4 years or so and in that time (really it was within the first few months) I have realized one thing, windows sucks.

      • My Linux story

        How I got started with linux I have been running Linux now for about 4 years or so and in that time (really it was within the first few months) I have realized one thing, windows sucks.

    • Linux

      My Preferred Linux SetupDistribution Void Linux I started my Linux journey on Mint, followed by Manjaro, then spent the lions share of my time in Arch/Arco. So how did I end up on Void?

      • My Preferred Linux Setup

        Distribution Void Linux I started my Linux journey on Mint, followed by Manjaro, then spent the lions share of my time in Arch/Arco. So how did I end up on Void?

  • Tutorials

    BashThe Bash PromptCustomizing Your Bash Prompt Is your bash prompt so ugly it makes you sad? Well look no further, in this article I am going to show you how to make your prompt the envy of the neighborhood.

    • Bash

      The Bash PromptCustomizing Your Bash Prompt Is your bash prompt so ugly it makes you sad? Well look no further, in this article I am going to show you how to make your prompt the envy of the neighborhood.

      • The Bash Prompt

        Customizing Your Bash Prompt Is your bash prompt so ugly it makes you sad? Well look no further, in this article I am going to show you how to make your prompt the envy of the neighborhood.

    • Installations

      Installing Void LinuxVoid Linux Install with BtrFS and encryption So you want to install Void Linux, well you’ve come to the right place, so without further ado, let’s get started.

      • Installing Void Linux

        Void Linux Install with BtrFS and encryption So you want to install Void Linux, well you’ve come to the right place, so without further ado, let’s get started. Section 1 - Select and Prepare the Device !

  • Docs

    VoidLinks to helpful documentation regarding Void Linux Check the build status for Void Linux - Void Buildbot Waterfall Live images and rootfs tarballs - Index of live/current/ Void Linux Github - Void Github

    • Void

      Links to helpful documentation regarding Void Linux Check the build status for Void Linux - Void Buildbot Waterfall Live images and rootfs tarballs - Index of live/current/ Void Linux Github - Void Github

  • About

    My name is Jake, I am the creator and maintainer of jpedmedia.com, the YouTube channel Jake@Linux, and the subreddit r/jakeatlinux. Get to know me(~) $: whoami _ I entered this world 40+ years ago, in the Pacific Northwest, Washington state, to be a little less vague, but moved my family to Northwest Arkansas in 2017 to escape the overpopulation and increasing cost of Washington.

    • Get to know me

      (~) $: whoami _ I entered this world 40+ years ago, in the Pacific Northwest, Washington state, to be a little less vague, but moved my family to Northwest Arkansas in 2017 to escape the overpopulation and increasing cost of Washington.

Subsections of Welcome

Posts

  • life

    My Linux storyHow I got started with linux I have been running Linux now for about 4 years or so and in that time (really it was within the first few months) I have realized one thing, windows sucks.

  • Linux

    My Preferred Linux SetupDistribution Void Linux I started my Linux journey on Mint, followed by Manjaro, then spent the lions share of my time in Arch/Arco. So how did I end up on Void?

Subsections of Posts

life

  • My Linux story

    How I got started with linux I have been running Linux now for about 4 years or so and in that time (really it was within the first few months) I have realized one thing, windows sucks.

Subsections of life

My Linux story

How I got started with linux

     I have been running Linux now for about 4 years or so and in that time (really it was within the first few months) I have realized one thing, windows sucks. I will never return to windows. Sure I have a windows partition on my system at the moment, but only because I have to use it for my software engineering degree, once that is finished, windows will be gone forever. So what is it you might ask that got me to switch? Let’s go back to the beginning.

     I was not a computer fan at all, we had a home computer but it was used for online banking, email, my kids homeschool work, and some mild gaming (my kids, not me, I’m not much for anything beyond NES or SNES). As an automotive technician, a lot of my resources were going away from books and becoming accessible only though computer, so I bought a laptop to access wiring diagrams and the repair manual and that sort of thing, my laptop came with windows (as they all do) and so that is what I used, I hated it. As much as I disliked using windows, that was what I had and all I knew, so that was that.

     One day I watched as my kids were playing a video game and, being the do-it-yourselfer that I am, I thought I bet I could make a video game, so I told my kids my plan and set to work to make the best video game ever made. Once I started, I realized what I had gotten myself into, and quickly found myself on youtube watching tutorials on basic coding, and game engines. While watching, I noticed something different about some of the creators systems, I thought what the heck is that? How do I make my system look and act like that? And that is where it all began. I found out that they were using Linux and I was sold.

      I knew nothing of Linux, I only heard about it years prior from a “crazy” guy I worked with, but other than that I had no clue what to expect or how to get it up an running on my system, so Google and YouTube to the rescue. I was so green I actually googled “What is better, Linux or Ubuntu, after searching and finding a ton about ubuntu but little about Linux specifically. Every time I looked up “How to install Linux” it showed me a tutorial about Ubuntu, so I did not know any better.

      Fast forward to me figuring out Linux has different distros and getting an iso downloaded and virtualbox set up, I created and booted a VM of Ubuntu and as soon as the login screen showed up and I saw the awful orange and purple, I closed it down and said nope. Next I found Linux Mint, and went through the process of setting up a VM of Mint and once booted and seeing that welcoming green colorscheme and that cinnamon desktop environment, I thought “This is more like it”. Cinnamon was intuitive, windows like, and an easy transition from what I was used to so I took right to it. I played with Mint in the VM for a while, and before long I found myself spending more time in my VM than on my windows machine, so I thought, “there has to be a better way”. Again, Google to the rescue. I quickly learned how to partition my drive and dual boot Mint with windows, since I still felt I needed my security blanket, I did not get rid of windows. Before I knew it, I was cruising and learning everything I needed to know and I spent less and less time in windows, and eventually, windows became unnecessary, at that point I wiped that side of my drive and let Mint be my daily driver. From that point on, I was all about the Linux life, no more windows for this guy and found I actually enjoyed using my computer. THE END……BUT WAIT, WHAT ABOUT THE BEST GAME EVER MADE!?

      You may be wondering, “What ever happened to that game you set out to make? Where can I find this marvel and play it?” Well, I made it, it was horrible, and I quickly erased any hint of its existence, but that being said, I did what I set out to do, create a video game, and in the end I wound up gaining so much more than just the sense of accomplishment from creating something from a few lines of code and a desire to show my kids that even if you are clueless at the beginning, if you are willing to work and study, just about anything is possible, I gained all that, and this amazing neckbeard (oh, and the experience and knowledge of using Linux).

God Bless,

Jacob Pedersen
Jake@Linux

Linux

  • My Preferred Linux Setup

    Distribution Void Linux I started my Linux journey on Mint, followed by Manjaro, then spent the lions share of my time in Arch/Arco. So how did I end up on Void?

Subsections of Linux

My Preferred Linux Setup

Distribution

Void Linux

I started my Linux journey on Mint, followed by Manjaro, then spent the lions share of my time in Arch/Arco. So how did I end up on Void? good question. I was making a long term distro review for my youtube channel covering Void linux and liked it so much I switched. I am a firm believer in the idea that distribution doesn’t matter, until it does.

Window Manager/Desktop Environment

herbstluftwm

I spend most of my time in Herbstluftwm but thoroughly enjoy trying out all available window managers. When I used a full desktop environment, cinnamon was my favorite, it is a well put together and intuitive environment that helped me transition from windows to linux.

Shell

Bash

With so many other “Better” (not really), options such as zsh and fish, with their auto suggestion and highlighting and plugins galore, why do I still use plain old Bash? Bash is the standard that most distros come with by default, and while the other shells may have more plugins and fanciness, I can accomplish a lot of the same functionality simply by configuring Bash and not installing a bunch of plugins and bloat. I’m not saying the other Shells are not useful or you shouldn’t use them, I just personally prefer the experience of configuring Bash as it helps me to understand what is happening and how things work as opposed to just installing a plugin and moving on.

Text Editor

Vim/Neovim

Need I say more?

Tutorials

  • Bash

    The Bash PromptCustomizing Your Bash Prompt Is your bash prompt so ugly it makes you sad? Well look no further, in this article I am going to show you how to make your prompt the envy of the neighborhood.

  • Installations

    Installing Void LinuxVoid Linux Install with BtrFS and encryption So you want to install Void Linux, well you’ve come to the right place, so without further ado, let’s get started.

Subsections of Tutorials

Bash

  • The Bash Prompt

    Customizing Your Bash Prompt Is your bash prompt so ugly it makes you sad? Well look no further, in this article I am going to show you how to make your prompt the envy of the neighborhood.

Subsections of Bash

The Bash Prompt

Customizing Your Bash Prompt

Is your bash prompt so ugly it makes you sad? Well look no further, in this article I am going to show you how to make your prompt the envy of the neighborhood.

The Prompt

The Bash prompt is the command-line interface feature in Unix-like operating systems, it is provided by the Bash shell (Bourne Again SHell). The prompt is the area where the user types commands and interacts with the system. It typically appears as a string of characters followed by a cursor, signaling that the shell is ready to accept input.

The PS variable (1-4)

The PS1 variable is what you use to create your primary prompt, this is the prompt most people think of and it is the prompt that lets the user know that the shell is ready to accept commands.

The PS2 variable is the secondary prompt, we won’t spend time on this, just be aware that it is the prompt that appears when the shell expects additional input to complete a command, for example when there is an unmatched parenthesis or quotation mark.

The PS3 variable is used with the select command, often used with a case statement. This is commonly used in the creation of menu scripts.

Lastly, the PS4 variable is used in conjunction with the xtrace, or -x, option and is displayed before each command is executed.

Stock Prompt

When you first install and open the Bash shell, the default prompt can be rather uninspiring, providing minimal information and lacking aesthetic appeal, it will most likely look something like this:

Bash prompt Bash prompt

Custom Prompt

Fortunately, customizing the Bash prompt is a simple yet effective way to personalize your command-line experience. By incorporating different character sequences, you can not only enhance the visual appeal but also display relevant information that suits your preferences. In the following steps, I’ll guide you through the basics of customizing your Bash prompt and soon, you’ll find yourself navigating the command line with a tailored and visually pleasing prompt that suits your style and preferences, something similar to this:

Image 1 Image 2 Image 2

The Character Sequences

To make changes to the prompt we need to use character sequences. Character sequences are used to change the appearance of your prompt, including color settings for text and background, and style settings for text including underline, bold, blinking, and bright

Before we begin, there are 2 character sequences you need to be aware of before you attempt to style your prompt and they are as follows:

\[

and

\]

These two sequences are important because they are used to enclose and indicate non-printing sequences. While these styling sequences are used to add color and style or other escape sequences to your prompt, they do not actually take up space on the command line so when you include these escape/style sequences without enclosing them in \[ and \], Bash may miscalculate the length of the prompt leading to misplacement of the cursor and this leads to character printing issues and other weird functional issues. By enclosing the non-printing sequences with \[ \] you tell the terminal to ignore these sequences when calculating the length of the prompt to ensure proper cursor placement and avoid unexpected behavior.

So take care to note in the following examples the escape sequences and the printed components of the prompts and which are wrapped and which are not.

Colors

Color is one customization you can use to create your ideal prompt, the following is a list of the color character codes, they are used in a sequence like this:

\[\e[32m\]
color fg number bg number
Black 30 40
White 37 47
Blue 34 44
Cyan 36 46
Green 32 42
Red 31 41
Yellow 33 43
Magenta 35 45

So for example:

PS1="\[\e[31m\]This is red text\[\e[m\] "  

Will create a prompt that looks like this:
This text red text.

While:

PS1="\[\e[41m\]This is red background\[\e[m\] "

Will create a prompt that looks like this:
This is red background

Style

Text color is nice, but what if you want to dress it up a little more, you can add a little style with an underline, bright/bold colors, dim colors, blinking text, or reversed text using the following codes:

style number
normal 0
bold/bright 1
dim 2
underline 4
blinking 5
reversed 7

Apply the style character your would lke to use as follows:

Underline:

\[\e[4;32m\]

So for example:

PS1="\[\e[4;32m\]This is green underlined text\[\e[m\] "  

will create a prompt that looks like this:
This is green underlined text

Bright:

\[\e[1;32m\]

So for example:

PS1="\[\e[1;32m\]This is bright green text\[\e[m\] "

will create a prompt that looks like this: (depending on your terminal colors and settings)
This is bright green text

note the 4; or the 1; in the character sequenct, the 1; is for bright, the 4; is for underline.

Information

Now that you know how to add color and style to your prompt, lets add the real important stuff, the stuff that gives you the needed information about where you are, what you are, who you are, and more.
The following table is a list of charater sequences and the description of what they display:

Character sequences Displays
\a The “alarm” character. Triggers a beep or a screen flash
\d The current date, displayed in the format Weekday Month Date (e.g., Wednesday May 13).
\D{format} The current date and time displayed according to format as interpreted by strftime. If format is omitted, \D{} displays current 12-hour A.M./P.M. time (e.g., 07:23:01 PM).
\e An escape character (ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) 27)
\e[numberm Denotes the beginning of a sequence to display in color. Number is a number, or pair of numbers, which specifies what color and style to use. See below for a list of colors and their number pairs.
\e[m Denotes the end of a sequence to display in color.
\h The hostname of the machine, up to the first “.” For instance, if the system’s hostname is myhost.mydomain, \h displays myhost
\H The full hostname of the machine.
\j Number of jobs being managed by the shell.
\l The shell’s terminal device identifier, usually a single-digit number.
\n A newline
\r Carriage return
\s The name of the shell (the basename of the process that initiated the current bash session).
\t Current time displayed in 24-hour HH:MM:SS format (e.g., 19:23:01).
\T Current time displayed in 12-hour HH:MM:SS format (eg. 07:23:01).
\@ Current time displayed in 12-hour HH:MM:SS A.M./P.M. format (e.g., 07:23:01 P.M.).
\A Current time in 24-hour HH:MM format, (e.g., 19:23).
\u The username of the current user.
\v Bash version number (e.g., 4.3).
\V Bash version and patch number (e.g., 4.3.30).
\w The current directory. The user’s home directory is abbreviated as a tilde ("~"). For example, /usr/bin, ~, or ~/documents
\W The basename of the current working directory (e.g., bin, ~, or documents).
\! The history number of the current command.
\# The command number of the current command (command numbers are like history numbers, but they reset to zero when you start a new bash session).
\nnn The ASCII character whose octal value is nnn.
\ A backslash
\[ Marks the beginning of any sequence of non-printing characters, such as terminal control codes.
\] Marks the end of a non-printing sequence.

So now that we have a nice list of the different characters you can use and what they will display, how do you use them? Well it is simple, say you want your prompt to show the name of the current user in white and the current working directory basename in red, that would look like this:

PS1="\u \[\e[31m\]\W\[\e[m\] "

With this configuration, your prompt will look like this:
(I will use Jake as my user name, and home as the current dir)
Jake ~

Or say you don’t care about color and you just want to display the date, just do this:

PS1="\d : "

This will display a prompt that looks like this:
Wednesday May 13 :

Now that we have a good idea of what character sequences do and how to use them the question becomes, where do we configure this? There are a couple of ways you can implement your own prompt. First, if you are just looking to change the prompt for the current session, you can just open your terminal, and enter the following:

bash-5.25: PS1="<enter your prompt configuration here>"

This will change your prompt for the current session, but it will return to normal once you close your terminal. If you want to change it permanently, all you have to do is set the PS1 variable to whatever you like in either your .bash_profile, or in your .bashrc (you can use your .profile as well, if you prefer, but the other 2 files are more commonly used). Once set in one of the bash files, just close your terminal and reopen it or use the following command, and your prompt will be permanently set, at least set until your edti your PS1 variable again.

source%

Now take your new knowledge and understanding of the PS1 variable and customize and configure to your hearts desire.

Installations

  • Installing Void Linux

    Void Linux Install with BtrFS and encryption So you want to install Void Linux, well you’ve come to the right place, so without further ado, let’s get started. Section 1 - Select and Prepare the Device !

Subsections of Installations

Installing Void Linux

Void Linux Install with BtrFS and encryption

So you want to install Void Linux, well you’ve come to the right place, so without further ado, let’s get started.

Section 1 - Select and Prepare the Device

!! NOTE: !! -ALL COMMANDS IN THIS TUTORIAL ARE RUN AS THE ROOT USER, IF YOU ARE NOT ROOT, BE SURE TO EITHER USE SUDO OR CHANGE TO ROOT

This section will cover partitioning your drive and adding encryption. There are many tools avalable to partition your drive, tools like cfdisk, parted, gparted, gdisk, etc, we will be using fdisk. As for encryption, we will be using luks1 since as of the writing of this, grub does not fully support luks2.

Step 1 - Partition

From the command line launch fdisk and point it to the device of your choosing, for this example I will use /dev/sdX. once fdisk is launched with the correct device, we need to create 2 parititons, the following are the selections needed:

fdisk /dev/sdX
Create GPT partition table
Command (m for help): g

Create EFI System Partition (ESP)
Command (m for help): n
Partition number (1-128, default 1): (enter for default)
First sector (2048-500118158, default 2048): (enter for default)
Last sector, +/-sectors or +/-size{K,M,G,T,P}...): +200M (choose 128M to 1G)
Do you want to remove the signature? [Y]es/[N]o: y
Command (m for help): t
Partition type or alias (type L to list all): 1

Create the root partition
Command (m for help): n
Partition number (2-128, default 2): (enter for default)
First sector (2099200-500118158, default 2099200): (enter for default)
Last sector, +/-sectors or +/-size{K,M,G,T,P}...): (enter for default)

Write changes to the disk
Command (m for help): w

Step 2 - Encrypt

Now that the device has been partitioned, we are ready to encrypt the root volume.

Again, since grub does not fully support luks2 we will be using luks1 using the following commands.

Encrypt the root volume with the following command:

cryptsetup luksFormat --type luks1 -y /dev/sdX2

It will warn you that this action will overwrite anything on the selected disk, type YES (all caps) to accept, then it will ask you to create and verify a password.

Now the the root volume is encrypted it is locked and cannot be edited, we need to open the root volume and give it a name with the following command: ( I am calling it cryptvoid, you can name it what ever you would like )

cryptsetup open /dev/sdX2 cryptvoid

you will be prompted for the password you just created and once verified, the encrypted root volume will be open.

Step 3 - Format Partitions

Now we are ready to format the paritions, we will make partition 1 the efi partition and install a fat filesystem and parition 2 will be the root partition with BtrFS.

format the efi parititon:

mkfs.fat -F32 -n EFI /dev/sdX1

format the root partition:

mkfs.btrfs -L Void /dev/mapper/cryptvoid

Step 4 - Create BtrFS Subvolumes

Now that we have the disk partitioned and the file systems created, now we need to create the subvolumes on the BtrFS volume.

First we will create a variable to store all the options we want to use, this is not completely necessary but will save on a lot of redundant typing

BTRFS_OPTS="rw,noatime,compress=zstd,discard=async"
  • rw = read/write permissions
  • noatime = no access time, prevents sys from updating access timestamp every time a file is accessed
  • compress = type of compression
    • zstd = using Zstandard compression algorithm
  • discard = improve efficiency of solid state drives by allowing them to reclaim unused space
    • async = operation will be performed asyncronously

Now we will mount the top level subvolume.

mount -o $BTRFS_OPTS /dev/mapper/cryptvoid /mnt 

Now that we have the top level subvolume mounted, it is time to create the subvolumes for root, home, and snapshots

Root subvolume

btrfs su cr /mnt/@

Home subvolume

btrfs su cr /mnt/@home

Snapshots subvolume

btrfs su cr /mnt/@snapshots

Unmount cryptvoid

umount /mnt

The last step of prep before we start the base install is to mount all the subvolumes and the EFI partition

Mount the root subvolume

mount -o $BTRFS_OPTS,subvol=@ /dev/mapper/cryptvoid /mnt

We now have our encrypted volume mounted and we need to create mountpoints for home, root, and snapshots

mkdir /mnt/{efi,home,.snapshots}

Mount the home subvolume

mount -o $BTRFS_OPTS,subvol=@home /dev/mapper/cryptvoid /mnt/home

Mount snapshots subvolume

mount -o $BTRFS_OPTS,subvol=@snapshots /dev/mapper/cryptvoid /mnt/.snapshots

While a key function and benefit of BtrFS is snapshots, there are certain directories that don’t need to be included in the snapshots, we will create some nested subvolumes for these specific directories

mkdir -p /mnt/var/cache
btrfs su cr /mnt/var/cache/xbps
btrfs su cr /mnt/var/tmp
btrfs su cr /mnt/srv

Mount the EFI system parition

mount -o rw,noatime /dev/sdX1 /mnt/efi

Check mountpoints and verify they are correct using one of the following 2 commands

df -h

or

lsblk

Section 2 - Installation

With the drive now partitioned, the file system created, and all volumes and subvolumes mounted, we can begin the base installation of Void Linux

Step 1 - Mirror, C library, Architecture, and Base-system metapackage

While this step is not required it is a good idea to choose a mirror close to your location, A list of mirrors can be found at https://xmirror.voidlinux.org/. However; you can just go with the default mirror if you choose to.

The closest mirror to me is Chicago, so in this example, I will use the Chicago mirror, https://mirrors.servercentral.com/voidlinux/.

Aside from which mirror you want to use, there are a few other choices you will need to make, one of these is which C library to use, Void gives the option of using glibc (Gnu C library) or musl (designed to be more lightweight).

  • glibc: /current
  • musl: /current/musl

There is also the question of architecture, you will need to select which architecture you plan to use from the following list:

  • x86_64
  • x86_64-musl
  • i686
  • aarch64
    I will use x86_64 for this example

Once you decide which mirror and library you want to use (we will be using Chicago mirror and glibc library), we can create a couple more variables to make the next steps a little easier, we need to create a variable for our repo, and a variable for our architecture.

REPO=https://mirrors.servercentral.com/voidlinux/current/
ARCH=x86_64

Create directory and copy RSA keys for verifying package integrity

mkdir -p /mnt/var/db/xbps/keys
cp /var/db/xbps/keys/* /mnt/var/db/xbps/keys/

Now we can install the base system along with a few other odds and ends. (this tutorial will install vim and the linux-mainline kernel, if you want stable, install linux instead of linux-mainline)

XBPS_ARCH=$ARCH xbps-install -S -R "$REPO" -r /mnt base-system linux-mainline btrfs-progs cryptsetup vim

Step 2 - Chroot

With the base system installed we are ready to chroot into our void environment but first we need to mount a pseudo-filesystem needed for chroot

for dir in dev proc sys run; do mount --rbind /$dir /mnt/$dir; mount --make-rslave /mnt/$dir; done

Copy dns configuration into new root so xbps can download new packages inside

cp /etc/resolve.conf /mnt/etc/

chroot into system

BTRFS_OPTS=$BTRFS_OPTS PS1='(chroot) # ' chroot /mnt/ /bin/bash

Step 3 - Installation Configuration

Next we will begin to configure our new install, this will involve setting a hostname, timezone, our hosts, creating an fstab, and more.
First lets look at our rc.conf, you can find and go over the options in this file in the void docs at httsp://docs.voidlinux.org/config/rc-files.conf we can make changes in here but it is not necessary

vim /etc/rc.conf

Set timezone, you can list out all available timezones by running the following command

ls /usr/share/zoneinfo

Once you locate the timezone you need, set the timezone in the /etc/localtime file, I will set the timezone to chicago in this example

ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/Chicago /etc/localtime

Next we will set our locale by editing /etc/default/libc-locales and uncommenting your locale. For me this would be en_US.UTF-8 and en_US ISO-8859-1

vim /etc/default/libc-locales

Once you uncomment and save the changes, you need to reconfigure

xbps-reconfigure -f glibc-locales

Set hostname in /etc/hostname
Replace <your chosen hostname> with what ever you want your hostname to be.

echo "<your chosen hostname>" > /etc/hostname

Create the /etc/hosts file, replace myhostname with the hostname you created in the last step.

cat <<EOF > /etc/hosts
#
# /etc/hosts: static lookup table for host names
#
127.0.0.1        localhost
::1              localhost
127.0.1.1        myhostname.localdomain myhostname
EOF

Step 4 - User Management

Now we will move into user management
First we need to create the root password

passwd

Now we can create a new user and give that user a password, add them the necessary groups, and give them sudo privilege
Replace <USER> with the name of the user you are adding

useradd <USER>
passwd <USER>
usermod -aG wheel, (any other groups you want to add user to) <USER>

Now we can change the shell for the root user to bash and edit the sudoers file

chsh -s /bin/bash root
EDITOR=vim visudo

Uncomment the line that says # %wheel ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL
Then you can also add the following line below the line you just uncommented, this is not required but it is an option

<USER> ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL

Step 5 - REPOS

Sync repositories

xbps-install -S

This step is not required unless you want to be able to access software that does not have free licenses or if you are a gamer or need 32bit packages

xbps-install void-repo-nonfree
xbps-install -S
xbps-install void-repo-multilib
xbps-install -S

step 6 - Create fstab

Now we can create our fstab, there are multiple ways to do this but we are going to use some command line magic and make this as easy as possible

Create variables for different volumes

EFI_UUID=$(blkid -s UUID -o value /dev/sdX1)
ROOT_UUID=$(blkid -s UUID -o value /dev/mapper/cryptvoid)
LUKS_UUID=$(blkid -s UUID -o value /dev/sdX2)

Next we will use these variables and create and populate our fstab

cat <<EOF > /etc/fstab
UUID=$ROOT_UUID / btrfs $BTRFS_OPTS,subvol=@ 0 1
UUID=$ROOT_UUID /home btrfs $BTRFS_OPTS,subvol=@home 0 2
UUID=$ROOT_UUID /.snapshots btrfs $BTRFS_OPTS,subvol=@snapshots 0 2
UUID=$EFI_UUID /efi vfat defaults,noatime 0 2
tmpfs /tmp tmpfs defaults,nosuid,nodev 0 0
EOF

Step 7 - Install and setup bootloader

We are now on the homestretch, a few more commands and it will be time to reboot

Install the grub package for efi

xbps-install grub-x86_64-efi

Enable encryption

echo GRUB_ENABLE_CRYPTODISK=y >> /etc/default/grub

Edit /etc/default/grub file

vim /etc/default/grub
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="loglevel=4 rd.auto=1 rd.luks.allow-discards"

Install grub

grub-install --target=x86_64-efi --efi-directory=/efi --bootloader-id="Void"

Section 3 - Miscellaneous

Step 1 - Keyfile (optional)

Create a keyfile to avoid typing passphrase 2x on boot

Create a keyfile out of random data

dd bs=515 count=4 if=/dev/urandom of=/boot/keyfile.bin

Add a 2nd key slot to the LUKS encrypted volume with keyfile.bin as the key

cryptsetup -v luksAddKey /dev/sdX2 /boot/keyfile.bin

Secure the keyfile by setting appropriate permissions

chmod 000 /boot/keyfile.bin 

Allow only root access to /boot

chmod -R g-rwx,o-rwx /boot 

Setup crypttab

cat <<EOF >> /etc/crypttab
cryptvoid UUID=$LUKS_UUID /boot/keyfile.bin luks
EOF

Cofigure dracut to include the keyfile and crypttab in the initial RAM disk

echo 'install_items+=" /boot/keyfile.bin /etc/crypttab "' > /etc/dracut.conf.d/10-crypt.conf
ln -s /etc/sv/dhc /etc/runit/runsvdir/default

Step 2 - Install software/programs/tools

Install software or programs you may want to install at this time

xbps-install <list of desired programs>

Link services that we want to start on boot
If you want to use a wired connection

ln -s /etc/sv/dhcpcd-eth0 /var/service
ln -s /etc/sv/dhcpcd /var/service

If you want to use wifi you can use wpa-supplicant or you can install Network Manager I prefer to use Network Manager so that is what I will use as an example

xbps-install NetworkManager
ln -s /etc/sv/NetworkManager /var/service

Use xbps to verify installed programs are configured correctly

xbps-reconfigure -fa

Step 4 - Exit and Reboot

Exit chroot

exit

Reboot system

reboot

Docs

  • Void

    Links to helpful documentation regarding Void Linux Check the build status for Void Linux - Void Buildbot Waterfall Live images and rootfs tarballs - Index of live/current/ Void Linux Github - Void Github

Subsections of Docs

About

My name is Jake, I am the creator and maintainer of jpedmedia.com, the YouTube channel Jake@Linux, and the subreddit r/jakeatlinux.

  • Get to know me

    (~) $: whoami _ I entered this world 40+ years ago, in the Pacific Northwest, Washington state, to be a little less vague, but moved my family to Northwest Arkansas in 2017 to escape the overpopulation and increasing cost of Washington.

It's me

Subsections of About

Get to know me

(~) $: whoami _

I entered this world 40+ years ago, in the Pacific Northwest, Washington state, to be a little less vague, but moved my family to Northwest Arkansas in 2017 to escape the overpopulation and increasing cost of Washington. I am married to a wonderful woman and we have 4 kids together, although two of them are hardly kids anymore. We have 4 cats ( I know I am shocked too ) even though collectively, they only have 7 eyes and 15 legs in the bunch, and 1 dog who is whole, just a little crazy.

I have been an automotive technician (or mechanic as my wife calls me) for the lions share of my life, starting in the independent world on all makes, then moving to the european market, followed by a move into the dealership side of things in the Japanese market, where I have been able to move up to gain the top level in the world of Toyota as a Master Diagnostic Technician, or MDT.

After so many years as a Technician, I have grown tired of the abuse my body takes on a daily basis but still enjoy the troubleshooting/problem solving aspect of my job as well as working with my hands to fix what was once broken. I am now, although I wasn’t always, interested in technology and so Linux has proven to be right up my alley.

I have an Associates Degree in Information Systems from Liberty University and am currently in school at WGU finishing up a Bachelors Degree in Software Engineering, and hope to be able to transition into a career in Technology/software which will afford me the ability to troubleshoot and problem solve, and work with my hands without the abuse on my body.